[acn-l] ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 7/7/00<~~ (fwd)

PETER.UNMACK at asu.edu
Thu, 13 Jul 2000 07:17:58 -0700 (MST)

From: FISH1IFR at aol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 02:37:04 EDT
Subject: ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 7/7/00<~~
To: AFS at wyoming.com, ACN-L at pinetree.org, crab-l at ios.bc.ca,
FishingForum at onelist.com, fishhabitat at mail.orst.edu,
oceancoalition at onelist.com, salmon at riverdale.k12.or.us

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~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 7/7/00<~~
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A WEEKLY QUOTA OF FISHERY SHORTS CAUGHT AND
LANDED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR FISHERIES RESOURCES
AND THE PACIFIC COAST FEDERATION OF FISHERMEN'S
ASSOCIATIONS

VOL 2, NO. 1 7 JULY 2000
<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>><<

2:01/01. REGIONAL FISHERIES MANAGEMENT COUNCIL
APPOINTMENTS ANNOUNCED, COMMERCE REFUSES TO
BALANCE PACIFIC COUNCIL: On Wednesday, 5 July, Deputy
Commerce Secretary Robert Mallett released the appointees for this year
to the nation's eight regional fishery management councils. The councils
were established by the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation &
Management Act to develop fishery management plans for U.S. ocean
fisheries. The councils are supposed to represent diverse fisheries
interests and are composed of representatives from state and federal
government; industry including commercial and recreational fishing and
environmental groups. Obligatory seats are state specific, while at-large
seats are regional. The following were appointed for three-year council
terms (Note: * indicates the individual is being reappointed):

Pacific Council - Obligatory seats: James Caito* - Caito Fisheries,
Fort Bragg, CA; Hans Radtke - Adjunct Professor, Oregon State
University, Yachats, OR; James Harp* - Tribal Representative, Quinault
Indian Nation, Amanda Park, WA. At-large seats: Robert Alverson* -
Executive Director, Fishing Vessel Owner's Association., Bothell, WA;
Donald Hansen - President, San Clemente Sportfishing, Inc., Dana Point,
CA.

North Pacific Council - Obligatory seats: David Benton - Retired
Deputy Commissioner, Alaska Department of Fish & Game, Juneau, AK;
Robert Penney - recreational fisherman, Anchorage, AK; David Fluharty*
- Research Associate Professor, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Western Pacific Council - Obligatory seats: Bryan Ho - Attorney,
manager of longline fishing vessels, Kaneohe, HI; Judith Guthertz* -
Academic Vice President, University of Guam, Agana, Guam; Aitofele
Sunia* - Legislature of America Samoa, Pago Pago, American Samoa.

In this round of appointments the Department of Commerce and its
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) failed to correct the current
imbalance of interests on the Pacific Council. For the past two years, the
PFMC has had no salmon troll representative, although salmon is one of
the two major fisheries regulated by that regional council. In this
appointments round Commerce/NMFS appointed a second charter boat
representative (Don Hansen who replaces another charter boat
representative, Bob Fletcher, who was termed out; both charter boat
representatives are from California). NMFS refusal to appoint a salmon
troll representative to the Pacific Council, in the PFMC's first 10 years, led
Congress, in its 1986 report language in that year's Magnuson Act
reauthorization, to call for such an appointment. In the nearly 25 years of
the Pacific Council only three trollers have ever served - Dave Danbom,
Scott Boley and Nat Bingham. According to PCFFA, part of the
problem in balancing the PFMC has been the California Department of
Fish & Game, which refused to put forward the name of a salmon
fisherman to replace Bingham after his death in 1998. And, this year
CDFG put the name of the one salmon fisherman submitted by California,
Dave Bitts, at the bottom of its list.

For a copy of the list of appointees to all eight regional fishery
management councils, contact Gordon Helm, NMFS, at (301) 713-2370.

2:01/02. INTERNATIONAL SQUID CONFERENCE SCHEDULED
FOR SEPTEMBER IN SPAIN: The Sixth International Cephalopod Trade
Conference is scheduled this year for 19-20 September in Madrid. The
conference will look at squid and octopus fisheries, a review of
cephalopod resources, world consumption and the influence of the World
Trade Organization (WTO) on trade in these seafood products. For more
information on the conference, e-mail: conferences at agra-europe.com.

2:01/03. OMEGA-3, IT'S NOT JUST FOR HEART DISEASE AND
CANCER: The health benefits of Omega-3 fatty acids, found naturally in
high quantities in such fish as wild salmon and sardines, for the prevention
ofheart disease and reducing the incidence of the formation of certain
types of cancerous tumors, has found another health use. New mothers
can reduce the chance of suffering post natal depression by increasing
their intake of fish, according to a National Institute of Health (NIH) study
that was reported in the Bulletin of theAustralian Seafood Industry
Council (ASIC). The NIH reported that new mothers lose an Omega-3 fat
called DHA through the placenta and breast milk. Dr. John Hibbelin who
conducted the study said that "in countries where fish consumption is
high, such as Japan and Singapore, the rates of postnatal depression are
nearly 50 times lower than in countries where fish is not eaten regularly,
such as Brazil and Australia." For more information contact either the
U.S. National Institute of Health or go to ASIC's website at:
http://www.asic.org.au.

2:01/04. HIGH TEMPERATURES, INADEQUATE FLOW
RELEASES FROM DAMS BLAMED FOR SALMON DIE-OFF ON
KLAMATH: In a 6 July article in the Humboldt Times-Standard, the
California Department of Fish & Game (CDFG) reported tens of
thousands of juvenile chinook salmon and steelhead trout were found dead
in the Klamath river after last week's unusually high temperatures.
According to biologists from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service no
carcasses from endangered coho salmon have been found. However, if
the temperatures are affecting these others salmon species they are
believed to have hit the coho just as hard. CDFG staff speculated that the
high mortality was probably related to unusually warm water
temperatures. The high temperatures are partially accounted for by less
water being released upriver by the Klamath Reclamation Project. CDFG
studies have indicated that significantly more water is needed in-river to
ensure the health of salmon than is being released this year.

On 9 June, Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund filed suit on behalf of
PCFFA and a number of other organizations against the Bureau of
Reclamation, which operates the Klamath Project, demanding higher flow
releases from the project to protect the fish (see Sublegals, 16 June 2000).
The suit was filed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
and the federal Wild & Scenic Rivers Act seeking a Temporary
Restraining Order against the Department of Interior agency from
reducing flow releases. The case, which is in Federal District Court for
Northern California, was amended today, 7 July, to include a cause of
action under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as well. Management of
the ocean salmon fishery from central Oregon to San Francisco is based
on the health of Klamath-origin stocks.

The fish kill by the Bureau of Reclamation could lead to more ocean
closures on the salmon fishery in the future and less fish available as well
for the in-river sport and tribal fisheries. Even if the federal court acts
promptly and renders a favorable decision for the fisheries it is unlikely it
will do much good this late in the season to help the fish now in the
Klamath River. For more information on the lawsuit, contact Jan
Hasselman, Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund at: (206) 343-7340.

2:01/05. SALMON CONFIRMED AS KEYSTONE SPECIES: A new
report issued by the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW)
confirms salmon play a key role in watershed health, including the food
chain of more than 137 separate species, and provide the only known
mechanism for renourishing nutrient poor coastal watersheds from the
oceans. The report, "Pacific Salmon and Wildlife," is a collaboration of
the work of several agencies and brings together more than 500 separate
scientific studies and decades of research. Salmon declines, according to
the research, trigger cascading declines of many of the ecosystems major
food chains for these 137 species as well as decrease overall watershed
fertility. For more information see:
http://ens.lycos.com/ens/jul2000/2000L-07-06-02.html. For a copy of the
report itself contact: Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, 600
Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091 or e-mail:
wickelrw at dfw.wa.gov.

2:01/O6. NEW REGIONAL GENERAL PERMIT (RGP) FOR
STREAM RESTORATION: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE)
released a new regional general permit (RGP) for the State of Oregon,
which should speed up the approval process for watershed and salmon
restoration projects authorized under the Clean Water Act (CWA). Instead
of the permit approval/denial process, there will be set terms and
conditions for restoration activities in Oregon that place large wood and
boulders in streams. To participate in stream restoration projects,
individuals need only meet the terms and conditions of the RGP, then
notify the Corps of Engineers when the project is done. For further
information on the new RGP visit:
http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/op/g/regs/rgp_stream.htm.

2:01/07: SLIDE PRESENTATION ON KLAMTH RIVER
WATERSHED ISSUES: The authors of the newly released book,
Balancing Water: Restoring the Klamath Basin, (University of California
Press) will present a slide presentation and lecture at the Dance Palace in
Pt. Reyes Station on Sunday 16 July, 1930 HRS. The book's focus is on
the diverse and often competing interests that occur in individual
watersheds. PCFFA has worked extensively in the Klamath Basin and the
Institute for Fisheries Resources has contracted with private
foundations and government in developing watershed information systems
based on that developed by Kier Associations for the Klamath (Klamath
Resource Information System or "KRIS"). The $5 admission charge and
sale of their $40 book will benefit the Tomales Bay Library Association
and the California History Collection of the Pt. Reyes library.

2:01/08: RIDING THE PERFECT STORM WAVE: With this month's
release of the movie, "The Perfect Storm" has come renewed public
interest in storms at sea, commercial fishing and swordfish. Author
Sebastian Junger, whose book the movie was based on, has set up a
foundation, funded in part from proceeds from the film, to help the
children and families of fishermen lost at sea. For more information on
The Perfect Storm Foundation, visit its website at:
http://www.perfectstorm.org .

2:01/09. DRAFT KELP PLAN FOR MONTEREY BAY: On
Thursday, 13 July, Save Our Shores (SOS) will host a public forum to
discuss the Draft Kelp Management report for the Monterey Bay National
Marine Sanctuary. The meeting is intended to focus on the
recommendations made by the sanctuary for regulating the take of kelp
within sanctuary waters. The session will include a panel of experts from
conservation, recreational users and kelp harvesters. The deadline for
public comment on the sanctuary's draft kelp report is 7 August.
While the sanctuary is preparing a report, the actual management and
conservation of kelp resources within California is under the jurisdiction
of the California Fish & Game Commission and the Department of Fish &
Game; the sanctuary report is advisory only to the state authorities.
Thursday's SOS meeting will be held from 1900 -2100 HRS at the
Douglas Beach House (Miramar) in Half Moon Bay. For more
information contact Vicki Nichols, SOS Director of Policy and Research
at (831)423-5063. The Draft Report is available at:
http://www.mbnms.nos.noaa.gov/research/techreports/kelpreport/
kelpreport.htm.

2:01/10. ROCKFISH WORKSHOP SCHEDULED THIS MONTH,
GROUNDFISH STRATEGIC PLAN COMMENTS DUE IN AUGUST:
The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Centers
for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (NOAA CSCOR) is sponsoring a
workshop on rockfish research scheduled for 24 July in Tiburon, CA. The
workshop is being organized by the University of California's Sea Grant
Extension Program, the California Resources Agency and the Oregon
Department of Land Conservation. The goal is to design a multi-year,
collaborative research program for nearshore rockfishes and other species
along the U.S. west coast. For more information on the workshop go to
the UC/Davis' Sea Grant Extension webpage at:
http://wfcb.ucdavis.edu/www/seagrant/rockfish.

The Pacific Fishery Management Council, meanwhile, is requesting
comment on its "Groundfish Fishery Strategic Plan" that includes a
proposal to reduce the groundfish fleet by fifty percent. Written
comments on the plan are due by 1 September. The plan itself will be
taken up by the PFMC at its 11-15 September meeting in
Sacramento. For a copy of the plan call the Pacific Council at (503)
326-6352 or visit the Council's website at: http://www.pcouncil.org.

2:01/11. CALIFORNIA INDUSTRIAL WELFARE COMMISSION
ADOPTS WAGE RULES FOR FISHING VESSELS: At its 30 June
meeting in Sacramento, California's Industrial Welfare Commission
adopted new regulations for the commercial fishing and charter fishing
boat fishing fleet, imposing for the first time minimum wage rules for
crew (see Sublegals, 3 March 2000). The IWC amended its Wage Order
14 (for commercial fishing vessels) and Wage Order 10 (for charter
sportfishing vessels). Under the new ruling, to comply IWC regulations to
an earlier ballot measure, crew on board commercial fishing vessels will
no longer be exempt from minimum wage requirements, however, the
minimum wage paid crewmembers can be deducted from their
vessel crew share. Overtime requirements will not apply. The ruling is
identical to that published in the Commission's 30 June notice and will
take effect on 1 October. PCFFA had sought to maintain the exemption
but the ballot initiative left the IWC with no options. For a copy or more
information go to the IWC website at: http://www.dir.ca.gov/iwc.

2:01/12. WHITE HOUSE PLAN FOR SALMON IS OUT: The
Clinton administration has released its five-year "All-H' plan to improve
and restore salmon runs on the Columbia and Snake Rivers in Oregon,
Washington, and Idaho. The White House does not estimate cost for these
measures and omits breaching dams within the plan. Fishing groups,
including PCFFA, tribal officials and environmental representatives have
found the Administration's proposals positive, but not ultimately helpful in
the recovery of salmon if Snake River dams are not breached. Go to:
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer2.ssf?/news/oregonian/
00/06/lc_51fishy29.frame

2:01/13. SAFINA NAMED MacARTHUR FELLOW: Carl Safina,
Vice President for Marine Conservation at the National Audubon Society
and author of Song for the Blue Ocean, the 1998 award-winning book on
the plight of marine fisheries and ocean ecosystems, has been awarded a
MacArthur Fellowship from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur
Foundation. He will receive $500, 000 over five years to support his work.
Safina also founded Audubon's Living Oceans Program, which combines
science, law, policy and communication in global marine conservation
issues.

2:01/14. NMFS AND RECREATIONAL BOATING GROUP
PROMOTE FISHING: While many of the world's fish stocks, including
many in U.S. waters, are threatened by overfishing as well as pollution
and habitat degradation, the National Marine Fisheries Service and Boat
Owners Association of The U.S. (Boat U.S.), the nation's largest
organization of recreational boaters, have announced a plan to promote
sport fishing. According to the announcement, the proposal also calls for
recreational marine fishing conservation and education programs by
promoting public education for marine resource conservation, angling
ethics and establishing environmentally responsible fishing opportunities.
A copy of the Code of Ethical Anglers is available at:
http://www.boatus.com.

2:01/15. DREDGING ALLOWED TO KILL ENDANGERED
TURTLES IN ATLANTIC, HOUSE PANEL REJECTS FUNDS TO
DREDGE COLUMBIA RIVER: The Associated Press reported on 5 July
that the federal government will permit dredging operations along the
Southeast Atlantic for beach replenishment and maintaining ship channels
that allow for the killing of 35 threatened loggerhead turtles plus 16 other
rarer turtles. While fishing operations are being closely monitored to
protect the turtles in fishing operations, "no one is counting too closely,"
says the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, of the turtles being taken and mangled
in the dredging operations to maintain beachfront property for wealthy
landowners and shipping channels used by the oil industry and other
maritime users.

Last month, however, the west coast fishing industry got some good
news when a House panel denied a request from members of the
Northwest Congressional Delegation for $4 million to dredge the
Colombia River navigation channel. The request was just a small part of
the $196 million estimated cost, but this denial deals a setback to this
project. Critics claim that deepening the channel would benefit shipping
businesses while damaging fisheries and the environment. Fishing groups,
including PCFFA and the Columbia River Crab Association, and
conservation groups are trying to stop the project, which threatens
dwindling Columbia salmon stocks and Dungeness crab, before it begins.

2:01/17. CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO DREDGED MUCK NOW
AVAILABLE: Coast Alliance has announced the availability of its new
citizen's gude about the threat to human health, fish and other wildlife
from exposure to contaminated dredged materials. The guide, Muddy
Waters, written by Beth Millman, "describes the impacts from polluted
muck and the areas in which the problem is most pronounced. It reviews
the laws that can be used to review dredging and dumping permits, and to
fight proposals that threaten human health and the environment. The
guide includes a comprehensive checklist of questions that people have
the right to ask about any permit and covers alternatives to dumping
sediments." The publication is available from Coast Alliance, 600
Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, Suite 340, Washington, DC 20003, e-mail:
jsavitz at coastalliance.org.

2:01/18. JOBS IN MARINE HABITAT PROTECTION: NOAA's
NMFS has two permanent vacancies in its Office for Habitat Conservation
in Silver Spring, MD. The first position focuses on habitat and
environmental issues associated with wetlands, anadromous fish, and
marine fish (closes 21 July). Applicants should have a strong background
in at least one of those fields. The second position is open to applicants
with a wider range of backgrounds (closes 17 July). Applicants should be
familiar with GIS software and applications to those fields listed above.
To receive information by phone call: Tom Bigford at (301)713-2325,
x180. The vacancies are posted at
http://www.rdc.noaa.gov/~hrmo/va-status.htm .


2:01/19. FLORIDA DAM BLASTED: A dam on Florida's Kissimmee
River has been taken down as part of a $500 million effort to restore 22 of
the 56 miles once turned into a canal for flood control. This dam has
caused 35,000 acres of wetlands to be destroyed. This is considered one of
Florida worst environmental mistakes. The restoration of the area is
expected to increase habitat for 320 species and reduce harmful nutrients
that are going into Lake Okeechobee by about 20 percent. An excellent
article on the destruction of Florida's everglades and nearshore fisheries
from the sugarcane industry (many of the dams and canals were
constructed to promote sugar plantations) appeared in the November 1999
issue of Harper's Magazine, "The Sweet Hereafter," by Paul Roberts (pp.
54-68). To view the article go to the magazine's website at:
http://www.harpers.org.

2:01/20. MARK-UP OF SNOWE BILL SOON?: The Senate
Commerce, Science & Transportation Committee scheduled "mark-up" of
S. 2832 by Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME) was originally set for 13 July
but this has been postponed. The bill, to reauthorize the
Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation & Management Act, contains
many provisions sought by fish processors and importers and some others
in the fishing industry to substantially weaken the nation's fishery law. It
is being opposed by commercial fishing groups, such as PCFFA,
committed to sustainable fisheries, as well as some recreational fishing
and most conservation organizations. For Committee schedules, visit the
Senate Commerce, Science & Transportation Committee website at:
http://www.senate.gov/~commerce.

2:01/21. MOSS LANDING POWER PLANT EXPANSION: The
California Energy Commission will hold a community meeting to discuss
the water quality and marine biology impacts associated with the proposed
expansion of the Moss Landing Power Plant. This project will extend the
life of the power plant for at least 30 more years and will result in
significant impacts to Elkhorn Slough and its resources, particularly to
fish larvae. The meeting will be held either 10th, 11th or 13th July, 1000
HRS at Moss Landing. Please contact the Public Advisor's Office at the
CEC ASAP for more information on the meeting and to be placed on the
notification list. They can be reached at (916)654-4489 or:
pao at energy.state.ca.us.

2:01/22. DNA RESEARCH ON CALIFORNIA SALMON
PUBLISHED IN CANADIAN FISHERIES JOURNAL: The May 2000
issue of the Canadian Journal of Fisheries (pp.915-927) contains a paper
by University of California's Bodega Marine Laboratory researchers,
Michael Banks, Vanessa Rashbrokk, Marco Calavetta, Cheryl Dean and
Dennis Hedgecock on DNA genetic structure and diversity of chinook
salmon in California's Central Valley. The DNA research came out of the
Winter-Run Captive Broodstock Program started in 1991 by PCFFA's late
Habitat Director, Nat Bingham, in collaboration with state and federal
fishery agencies, private research institutions and UC/Davis' Bodega
Marine Laboratory. The research undertaken by the University
researchers established DNA markers for the endangered Sacramento
River winter-run salmon and the other runs of chinook in the Central
Valley system. The paper is dedicated to the memory of Nat Bingham.
For a reprint of the paper, contact the Bodega Marine Laboratory at: (707)
875-2211.

2:01/23. NEW E-MAIL, WEBSITE ADDRESS FOR OCEAN
WATCH: Ocean Watch, the conservation arm of Australia's fishing
industry has announced its new Internet addresses. Ocean Watch and its
Executive Director, Duncan Leadbitter, have worked closely with fishing
groups in the U.S., Canada and Europe. The new e-mail address is:
ocean at oceanwatch.org.au, the new website address is:
http://www.oceanwatch.org.au.

2:01/24. MOVE OVER GMO'S, ADFG CROSS-BREEDING
CHINOOK AND PINK SALMON: The 6-12 July issue of the Anchorage
Press reports that the Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADFG) has
been cross-breeding chinook and pink salmon and about 40,000 of these
fish are being held in holding tanks at a hatchery on Fort Richardson, as
well as in two land-locked lakes in the Mut-Su Valley. Apparently the
fish were developed by the fishery agency to replace catchable king
salmon. While not exactly the genetically modified (GMO) Atlantic
salmon recently produced at facilities at Prince Edward Island and New
Zealand, the development of these hybrids does give cause for alarm
regarding their possible impact on native stocks if released into the wild.
That, and what to call them: should they be referred to as "Chumpies" or
"Kinks"? To view the article, go to that issue at:
http://www.anchoragepress.com.

In the meantime it has been reported that Norwegian-bred salmon have
been genetically modified and exposed to cancer causing vaccines,
according to a former Norwegian fish inspector. Farmed Atlantic salmon
in the Pacific Northwest are also being called a "biological pollutant" in a
case that was initiated late last year by the Marine Environmental
Consortium and Washington Environmental Council before the
Washington Department of Ecology. Finally, the June issue of
Conservation Biology reports that farmed Atlantic salmon escaping from
their pens and may constitute an "invasive species" threatening native
Pacific salmon in the Northwest. For more information, go to:
http://www.conbio.rice.edu/scb/.

2:01/25. CLACKAMAS COUNTY, OREGON SAVE THE SALMON;
A REGULAR HOUSEHOLD DUTY: Everybody recycles, so why
shouldn't everyone make their households and daily lives more salmon
friendly? This is a current undertaking in Clackamas County, Oregon.
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has had a large part in
promoting awareness over the past few years about the significant decline
of salmon in the Willamette River and Puget Sound. But the landscape
around the watersheds is primarily urban and many of the occupants want
to have green lawns and clean cars, even if it means using harmful
chemicals. Regional Coalition for Clean Rivers and Streams is an
organization that is promoting the well-being of the fish in ways today's
fast-paced consumers can relate to. One idea is printing "fish-friendly" on
some household product labels. Celilo Group, with guidance from
environmental businesses, will produce a coupon book for over $1,500
in savings on environmentally-safe household products. They will be
distributed to local schools for use as a fund-raiser. By teaching young
school-age children awareness of the issues, it is hoped future generations
will adopt general practices that are more fish-friendly. For more
information visit: http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index.ssf?/news/
oregonian/00/07/lc_31fish04.frame.

2:01/26. COMMENTS DUE ON COAST GUARD FISHING VESSEL
SAFETY ACTION PLAN: Comments on the U.S. Coast Guard's Action
Plan for fishing vessel safety are due by 23 July. The Coast Guard has
been holding a series of "listening sessions" around the country to get
input from the fishing industry. To view the
Action Plan visit: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/advisory/
cfivac/fishexpo99.pdf or contact Ensign Chris O'Neal at (800) 842-8740,
Ext 7-2008.

The Coast Guard's District 11 Marine Safety Office (MSO) now has a
new Fishing Vessel Safety website at: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/
Access this site for information on vessel requirements, forms for EPIRB
registration, FCC Radio licenses, and other materials.

2:01/27. COMMENT PERIOD EXTENDED ON NMFS PROPOSED
CLOSURE OF HUNTINGTON FLATS DRIFTNET FISHERY: The
National Marine Fisheries Service has reopened the public comment
period on a proposed rule to prohibit the use of setnet (gillnet and trammel
nets) fishing gear to take groundfish species in portions of the exclusive
economic zone (EEZ) adjacent to state waters at four areas off California.
Three of the areas are presently closed by the State of California; the
fourth is the Huntington Flats area off San Pedro where the driftnet fishery
has been pursued by a small boat fleet of approximately 35 vessels with
no problems. Comments must be received on or before 3 August and
should be sent to Rodney R. McInnis, Acting Regional Administrator,
Southwest Region, NMFS, 501 West Ocean Blvd., Suite 4200, Long
Beach, CA 90802. For more information, call: Svein Fougner, NMFS,
(562) 980-4040.

NOTES ON SUBLEGALS: This is the first issue of the second volume
of Sublegals, now in the second half of its first year of publication by
PCFFA and IFR as an Internet weekly newsletter of fishery briefs. (Faxed
copies are available to those who request them). To help reference articles
from past issues, a new coding system is being utilized. The first number
refers to the volume, the second to the issue and the third to the article
number in that issue. We hope this will make it easier for readers to
reference back articles when they are needed as additional information or
background.

GOT NEWS?: Submit news items to Molly Thomas, Editor at:
ifrfish at aol.com or call the IFR office with the news and a source at
either: (415) 561-FISH (Southwest Office) or (541) 689-2000 (Northwest
Office).

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